Australia’s leading bookseller for 140 years. Buy securely. Saver & express delivery.

{{ product.title }}

To: {{ product.giftCardToEmail }}
${{ getOriginalPrice(product) | formatPrice }}   ${{ product.totalDiscountAmount | formatPrice }} saved
${{ product.RRP | formatPrice }}
${{ product.totalPrice | formatPrice }}
Qty:{{ product.quantity }}
Your cart is empty.
Menu
Find a store

{{ product.title }}

To: {{ product.giftCardToEmail }}
${{ getOriginalPrice(product) | formatPrice }}   ${{ product.totalDiscountAmount | formatPrice }} saved
${{ product.RRP | formatPrice }}
${{ product.totalPrice | formatPrice }}
Qty:{{ product.quantity }}
Your cart is empty.

So You're Obsessed With Politics



Run For Your Life by Bob Carr 


Political memoirs are often worthy but boring. Not Bob Carr's. One of Australia's leading politicians tears up the rules. His account plunges into the unintended consequences of politics, the twists and turns, loaded with furious self-criticism. He lashes himself for ignoring a cry from a cell in Goulburn Gaol and berates his failure to convert the country to reduced immigration and population growth.

Revealed, too, is his joy in saving nature, running good budgets, thrashing opponents, surviving against the odds. He talks about not having kids, about outsmarting the conservatives on law enforcement, about forcing the notorious Obeid out of cabinet. He tells how on a whim, in his last days in opposition, he forced a Royal Commission to upend the state's police, describes what he learnt from Neville Wran and how as a kid, from a working class suburb, he was inspired by Gough Whitlam. He celebrates the Olympics-'the world's best'-without the games.

This 'anti-memoir' takes a critical look at the author- his failure to be ignited by sport (except on two notable occasions) and why in politics being true to your quirky self is good advice. 

Silence the jet skis! Liberate the dolphins! Take James Hardy to the cleaners! Declare more wilderness!



 
In his forthcoming book, former FBI director James Comey shares his never-before-told experiences from some of the highest-stakes situations of his career in the past two decades of American government, exploring what good, ethical leadership looks like, and how it drives sound decisions. His journey provides an unprecedented entry into the corridors of power, and a remarkable lesson in what makes an effective leader. Mr. Comey served as director of the FBI from 2013 to 2017, appointed to the post by President Barack Obama. He previously served as U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York, and the U.S. deputy attorney general in the administration of President George W. Bush. From prosecuting the Mafia and Martha Stewart to helping change the Bush administration's policies on torture and electronic surveillance, overseeing the Hillary Clinton e-mail investigation as well as ties between the Trump campaign and Russia, Comey has been involved in some of the most consequential cases and policies of recent history.

Silent Invasion: China’s Influence in Australia by Clive Hamilton 

In 2008 Clive Hamilton was at Parliament House in Canberra when the Beijing Olympic torch relay passed through. He watched in bewilderment as a small pro-Tibet protest was overrun by thousands of angry Chinese students. Where did they come from? Why were they so aggressive? And what gave them the right to shut down others exercising their democratic right to protest? The authorities did nothing about it, and what he saw stayed with him.

In 2016 it was revealed that wealthy Chinese businessmen linked to the Chinese Communist Party had become the largest donors to both major political parties. Hamilton realised something big was happening, and decided to investigate the Chinese government’s influence in Australia. What he found shocked him.

From politics to culture, real estate to agriculture, universities to unions, and even in our primary schools, he uncovered compelling evidence of the Chinese Communist Party’s infiltration of Australia. Sophisticated influence operations target Australia’s elites, and parts of the large Chinese-Australian diaspora have been mobilised to buy access to politicians, limit academic freedom, intimidate critics, collect information for Chinese intelligence agencies, and protest in the streets against Australian government policy. It’s no exaggeration to say the Chinese Communist Party and Australian democracy are on a collision course. The CCP is determined to win, while Australia looks the other way.

Thoroughly researched and powerfully argued,Silent Invasionis a sobering examination of the mounting threats to democratic freedoms Australians have for too long taken for granted. Yes, China is important to our economic prosperity; but, Hamilton asks, how much is our sovereignty as a nation worth?

Anyone keen to understand how China draws other countries into its sphere of influence should start withSilent Invasion. This is an important book for the future of Australia. But tug on the threads of China’s influence networks in Australia and its global network of influence operations starts to unravel.Professor John Fitzgerald, author ofBig White Lie: Chinese Australians in White Australia

Keating by Kerry O'Brien 

The life of one of Australia's most intriguing public figures, former Prime Minister Paul Keating, as told to the country's most influential political interviewer, Kerry O'Brien. This long awaited collaboration is a biography unlike any other.

Paul Keating is widely credited as the chief architect of the most significant period of political and economic reform in Australia's history. Twenty years on, there is still no story from the horse's mouth of how it all came about. No autobiography. No memoir. Yet he is the supreme story-teller of politics.

This book of revelations fills the gap. Kerry O'Brien, the consummate interviewer who knew all the players and lived the history, has spent many long hours with Keating, teasing out the stories, testing the memories and the assertions.

What emerges is a treasure trove of anecdotes, insights, reflections and occasional admissions from one of the most loved and hated political leaders we have known - a man who either led or was the driving force through thirteen years of Labor government that changed the face of Australia.

This is a man who as prime minister personally negotiated the sale of a quarter of the government-owned Qantas in his own office for $665 million, then delighted in watching the buyer's hand shake so much that champagne spilt down his shirtsleeve. He tells of his grave moment of doubt after making one of the riskiest calls of his political life, and how he used an acupuncturist and a television interviewer to seize the day.

There are many stories of this kind. The revealing inside stories and even glimpses of insecurities that go with the wielding of power, from a man who had no fear collecting his share of enemies and ended up with more than enough, but whose parliamentary performances from 25 years ago are watched avidly on YouTube today by a generation that was either not yet born or in knee pants when he was at his peak.

We'll never get an autobiography or a memoir from Keating. This is as good as it gets - funny, sweeping, angry, imaginative, mischievous, with arrogance, a glimmer of humility and more than a touch of creative madness. Keating unplugged.




 
What Happened by Hillary Rodham Clinton 

“In the past, for reasons I try to explain, I’ve often felt I had to be careful in public, like I was up on a wire without a net. Now I’m letting my guard down.”—Hillary Rodham Clinton, from the introduction ofWhat Happened

For the first time, Hillary Rodham Clinton reveals what she was thinking and feeling during one of the most controversial and unpredictable presidential elections in history. Now free from the constraints of running, Hillary takes you inside the intense personal experience of becoming the first woman nominated for president by a major party in an election marked by rage, sexism, exhilarating highs and infuriating lows, stranger-than-fiction twists, Russian interference, and an opponent who broke all the rules. This is her most personal memoir yet.

In these pages, she describes what it was like to run against Donald Trump, the mistakes she made, how she has coped with a shocking and devastating loss, and how she found the strength to pick herself back up afterward. With humor and candor, she tells readers what it took to get back on her feet—the rituals, relationships, and reading that got her through, and what the experience has taught her about life. She speaks about the challenges of being a strong woman in the public eye, the criticism over her voice, age, and appearance, and the double standard confronting women in politics.

She lays out how the 2016 election was marked by an unprecedented assault on our democracy by a foreign adversary. By analyzing the evidence and connecting the dots, Hillary shows just how dangerous the forces are that shaped the outcome, and why Americans need to understand them to protect our values and our democracy in the future.

The election of 2016 was unprecedented and historic.What Happenedis the story of that campaign and its aftermath—both a deeply intimate account and a cautionary tale for the nation.



 

From the Corner of the Oval Office: One Woman’s True Story of Her Accidental Career in the Obama White House by Beck Dorey Stein 

In 2012, Beck Dorey-Stein was just scraping by in Washington DC when a posting on Craigslist landed her, improbably, in the Oval Office as one of Barack Obama's stenographers. The ultimate DC outsider, she joined the elite team who accompanied the president wherever he went, recorder and mic in hand. On whirlwind trips across time zones, Beck forged friendships with a tight group of fellow travellers - young men and women who, like her, left their real lives behind to hop aboard Air Force One in service of the president. But as she learned the ropes of protocol, Beck became romantically entangled with a colleague, and suddenly, the political became all too personal. 

Set against the backdrop of a White House full of glamour, drama and intrigue, this is the story of a young woman making unlikely friendships, getting her heart broken, learning what truly matters and discovering her voice in the process.




 
Hillbilly Elegy by JD Vance 

From a former marine and Yale Law School graduate, a powerfulaccount of growing up in a poor Rust Belt town that offers a broader, probing look at the struggles of America s white working class

Hillbilly Elegyis a passionate and personal analysis of a culture in crisis that of white working-class Americans. The decline of this group, a demographic of our country that has been slowly disintegrating over forty years, has been reported on with growing frequency and alarm, but has never before been written about as searingly from the inside. J. D. Vance tells the true story of what a social, regional, and class decline feels like when you were born with it hung around your neck.

The Vance family story begins hopefully in postwar America. J. D. s grandparents were dirt poor and in love, and moved north from Kentucky s Appalachia region to Ohio in the hopes of escaping the dreadful poverty around them. They raised a middle-class family, and eventually their grandchild (the author) would graduate from Yale Law School, a conventional marker of their success in achieving generational upward mobility.

But as the family saga ofHillbilly Elegyplays out, we learn that this is only the short, superficial version. Vance s grandparents, aunt, uncle, sister, and, most of all, his mother, struggled profoundly with the demands of their new middle-class life, and were never able to fully escape the legacy of abuse, alcoholism, poverty, and trauma so characteristic of their part of America. Vance piercingly shows how he himself still carries around the demons of their chaotic family history.

A deeply moving memoir with its share of humor and vividly colorful figures, Hillbilly Elegyis the story of how upward mobility really feels. And it is an urgent and troubling meditation on the loss of the American dream for a large segment of this country.


New Power by Henry Timms and Geremy Heimans

Power is changing. 

Once held by the few, it was hoarded and jealously guarded, like currency. But the technological revolution of the past two decades has made possible a new form of power, one that operates differently, like a current. 'New Power' is for the many; it is open, participatory, often leaderless and peer-driven. Like water or electricity, it is most forceful when it surges. The challenge with new power is not to hoard it, but to channel it. New power is what fuels the rise of participatory communities like Facebook and YouTube, sharing services like Uber and AirBnB and rapid-fire social movements like Brexit and #BlackLivesMatter. It explains the unlikely success of Barack Obama's 2008 campaign and the unlikelier victory of Donald Trump in 2016. And it gives ISIS its power to propagate its brand and distribute violence. Even old power institutions like the Papacy, NASA and LEGO have tapped into the strength of the crowd to stage improbable reinventions.

In New Power, the business leaders/social visionaries Jeremy Heimans and Henry Timms provide the tools for using new power to successfully spread an idea or lead a movement in the twenty-first century. Drawing on examples from business, politics, and social justice, they explain the new world we live in-a world where connectivity has made change shocking and swift and a world in which, more and more, everyone expects to participate.



 
Russian Roulette by Michael Isikoff and David Corn  

RUSSIAN ROULETTE is a story of political skullduggery unprecedented in American history. It weaves together tales of international intrigue, cyber espionage, and superpower rivalry. After U.S.-Russia relations soured, as Vladimir Putin moved to reassert Russian strength on the global stage, Moscow trained its best hackers and trolls on U.S. political targets and exploited WikiLeaks to disseminate information that could affect the 2016 election.

 

The Russians were wildly successful and the great break-in of 2016 was no &quote;third-rate burglary.&quote; It was far more sophisticated and sinister -- a brazen act of political espionage designed to interfere with American democracy. At the end of the day, Trump, the candidate who pursued business deals in Russia, won. And millions of Americans were left wondering, what the hell happened? This story of high-tech spying and multiple political feuds is told against the backdrop of Trump's strange relationship with Putin and the curious ties between members of his inner circle -- including Paul Manafort and Michael Flynn -- and Russia.

 

RUSSIAN ROULETTE chronicles and explores this bizarre scandal, explains the stakes, and answers one of the biggest questions in American politics: How and why did a foreign government infiltrate the country's political process and gain influence in Washington?



West Winging It by Pat Cunnane  

A fish-out-of-water story. Only these fish are trying to run the United States of America.

 

WEST WINGING IT is the hilarious and charming personal story of Pat Cunnane's journey from outsider to insider - from a mundane job at a warehouse to his dream job at the White House. Pat pulls the drapes back on the most famous, exclusive building in the United States, telling the story of the real West Wing with compelling, eccentric portraits of the people who populate the place, from the president to the press corps. Pat takes you into the Oval Office, providing a witty insider's glimpse of the minutiae and the momentous of what it's really like to work at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue.

 

Along the way Pat draws an intimate portrait of the side of President Obama that few were privy to - the funnyman, the nerd, the athlete. He describes both the small details - the time he watched in horror as the president reached over the sneeze guard at Chipotle - and the larger, historic moments, such as traveling to South Africa for Nelson Mandela's funeral or watching the president handle the news of the 2015 terrorist attacks in Paris. In some ways, working at the White House is a lot like every office, and in some ways, it's like no office ever. Pat recounts the time he accidentally slammed a door on Joe Biden, plotted to have the Pope bless him by faking a sneeze, and almost killed America's First Dog.

 

Filled with sharp observations and exclusive photos, WEST WINGING IT is for anyone who has ever wanted to see behind the scenes at the White House.


War on Peace: The End of Diplomacy and the Decline of American Influence by Ronan Farrow  

A harrowing exploration of the collapse of American diplomacy and the abdication of global leadership.

American diplomacy is under siege. Offices across the State Department sit empty, while abroad the military-industrial complex has assumed the work once undertaken by peacemakers. We're becoming a nation that shoots first and asks questions later.

In an astonishing account ranging from Washington D.C. to Afghanistan, Pakistan, and North Korea in the years since 9/11, acclaimed journalist and former diplomat Ronan Farrow illuminates one of the most consequential and poorly understood changes in American history. His first-hand experience in the State Department affords a personal look at some of the last standard bearers of traditional statecraft, including Richard Holbrooke, who made peace in Bosnia and died trying to do so in Afghanistan. Farrow's narrative is richly informed by interviews with warlords, whistleblowers, and policymakers, from Henry Kissinger to Hillary Clinton. Diplomacy, Farrow argues, has declined after decades of political cowardice, short-sightedness, and outright malice –but it may just offer America a way out of a world at war.




 
The Dismissal by Paul Kelly and Troy Bramston 

Forty years on, the dismissal remains one of the most damaging and controversial events in Australian politics. This groundbreaking book by two of our leading journalists provides a startling reinterpretation of events. It tells the story of the clash between extraordinary personalities- two political giants - Gough Whitlam and Malcolm Fraser - and an ambitious and calculating governor-general, Sir John Kerr. Drawing on a range of new sources, some of which have never before been made public - including hundreds of pages from Kerr's archives - this remarkable account is dispassionate in its analysis, vivid in its narrative and brutal in its conclusions. It exposes the true motivations, the extent of the deceit and the scale of the collusion.





 
Duterte Harry: Fire and Fury in the Philippines by Jonathon Miller  

The first biography of Rodrigo Duterte, the murderous, unpredictable President of the Philippines, whose war on drugs has seen thousands of people killed in cold blood.

Rodrigo Duterte was elected President of the Philippines in 2016. In his first six months in office, 5,000 people were murdered on the streets, gunned down by police officers and vigilante citizens - all with his encouragement and blessing.

Duterte is a serial womaniser and a self-confessed killer, who has called both Barack Obama and Pope Francis 'sons of whores'. He is on record as saying he does not 'give a shit' about human rights. Yet he is beloved of the 16.6 million Filipinos who voted for him, seen as down and dirty, vulgar but honest, a breath of fresh air, and an iconoclastic, anti-imperialist rebel.

In this revelatory biography, reporter Jonathan Miller charts Duterte's meteoric rise to success, and shows how this fascinating, fearsome man can be seen as the embodiment of populism in our time.

Through interviews with Duterte himself, his sister, daughter and son, two former presidents, old friends, death squad hitmen, and relatives of his victims, Miller shows that far from the media cartoon of The Godfather, John Wayne, Hugo Chavez, and Donald Trump rolled into one, Duterte is a sinister, dangerous man, who should not be taken lightly.



 

Prisoners of Geography by Tim Marshall 

All leaders are constrained by geography. Their choices are limited by mountains, rivers, seas and concrete. Yes, to understand world events you need to understand people, ideas and movements...but if you dont know geography, youll never have the full picture.; To understand Putins actions, for example, it is essential to consider that, to be a world power, Russia must have a navy. And if its ports freeze for six months each year then it must have access to a warm water port - hence, the annexation of Crimea was the only option for Putin. To understand the Middle East, it is crucial to know that geography is the reason why countries have logically been shaped as they are - and this is why invented countries (e.g. Syria, Iraq, Libya) will not survive as nation states.; Spread over ten chapters (covering Russia; China; the USA; Latin America; the Middle East; Africa; India and Pakistan; Europe; Japan and Korea; and Greenland and the Arctic), using maps, essays and occasionally the personal experiences of the widely travelled author, Prisoners of Geography looks at the past, present and future to offer an essential guide to one of the major determining factors in world history.




 
The Future is History by Masha Gessen 

'A brave and eloquent critic of the Putin regime ... For anyone wondering how Russia ended up in the hands of Putin and his friends, and what it means for the rest of us, Gessen's book gives an alarming and convincing picture.' - The Times

In The Future is History Masha Gessen follows the lives of four Russians, born as the Soviet Union crumbled, at what promised to be the dawn of democracy. Each came of age with unprecedented expectations, some as the children or grandchildren of the very architects of the new Russia, each with newfound aspirations of their own - as entrepreneurs, activists, thinkers and writers, sexual and social beings. Gessen charts their paths not only against the machinations of the regime that would seek to crush them all (censorship, intimidation, violence) but also against the war it waged on understanding itself, ensuring the unobstructed emergence of the old Soviet order in the form of today's terrifying and seemingly unstoppable mafia state. 

The Future is History is a powerful and urgent cautionary tale by contemporary Russia's most fearless inquisitor.



 
Wednesdays with Bob by Derek Rielly and Bob Hawke 

On Wednesdays, Robert J. Hawke - Australia's 23rd and oldest living prime minister - has welcomed Derek Rielly into his home to share fine cigars and irreverent conversation. On a sun-soaked balcony, the maverick young writer and the charismatic old master talk life, death, love, sex, religion, politics, sport ... and everything in between.

On other days, to paint his subject's enigma from the outside, Rielly interviews Hawke's Liberal MP rival John Howard, Labor allies Gareth Evans and Kim Beazley, wife and lover Blanche d'Alpuget, live-in stepson Louis Pratt, and friends - diplomat Richard Woolcott, economist Ross Garnaut, advertising guru John Singleton, and longtime mate Col Cunningham.

The result is an extraordinary portrait of a beloved Australian - a strange, funny, uniquely personal study of Bob Hawke ruminating on his (and our) past, present and future.

Posted by Global Administrator on 25/06/2018