Australia’s leading bookseller for 140 years. Buy securely. Saver & express delivery.

{{ product.title }}

To: {{ product.giftCardToEmail }}
${{ getOriginalPrice(product) | formatPrice }}   ${{ product.totalDiscountAmount | formatPrice }} saved
${{ product.RRP | formatPrice }}
${{ product.totalPrice | formatPrice }}
Qty:{{ product.quantity }}
Your cart is empty.
Menu
Find a store

{{ product.title }}

To: {{ product.giftCardToEmail }}
${{ getOriginalPrice(product) | formatPrice }}   ${{ product.totalDiscountAmount | formatPrice }} saved
${{ product.RRP | formatPrice }}
${{ product.totalPrice | formatPrice }}
Qty:{{ product.quantity }}
Your cart is empty.

Q&A with Michael Pryor

Michael Pryor is one of Australia's premier science-fiction and fantasy authors. He has more than a million words in print, having published more than thirty-five books and over fifty short stories.
 
Michael has been shortlisted seven times for the Aurealis Awards and seven of his books have been CBCA Notable Books, so when he offered to answer some of our questions to support our Books For Kids campaign we were thrilled to have him on board!
 
Michael’s latest novel Gap Year in Ghost Town is a YA story and has been described as ‘the Australian YA answer to Supernatural you didn’t know you were waiting for’ by Books+Publishing. He’ll tell you a bit more about it below, so read on to find out what Michael’s favourite childhood book was, what he’s reading now, and which book he thinks every Aussie kid should read before leaving primary school.
 
Which book changed your life as a child?
The Magician’s Nephew by C.S. Lewis, the first of the Narnia books. It was the first full blown Fantasy book I ever read and it showed me the possibilities of magic and the imagination.
 
Who was your favourite author as a child? 
C.S. Lewis.
 
What is your favourite childhood book?
The Hobbit, and not just because it led on The Lord of the Rings, but because of its own, imaginative delights. Dwarves, wizards, trolls, magic, elves, it had everything I didn’t know I needed before I read it.
 
At what age do you recall discovering the life-changing magic of reading?
I don’t really have a memory of not reading, but, significantly, my early years were spent in towns and schools without libraries. I knew about libraries, because I’d read about them and I yearned for such a cool thing – a whole place dedicated to books. I mean, could there be anything better? When we moved to the relative metropolis of Geelong, I was stunned to learn of something that bordered on the fantastic: a mobile library stopped right at the end of our street. Not just a library, but one that came to me! When I climbed the steps into the book bus it was like entering an enchanted kingdom, one that I have never left.
 
How has reading changed your life?
Firstly, reading led me to become a writer. I loved reading so much that I wanted to do for other people what those writers were doing for me. Secondly, because reading fosters empathy and a broad and tolerant worldview, I like to think that reading has simply made me a better person.
 
How do you hope your books will make your readers feel?
I want my books to make my readers think and feel. I want them to think about other people and other ways and other possibilities. I want them to be inspired and exhilarated. I want them to be appalled and outraged. I want them to be flabbergasted and tickled. I want them to laugh and I want them to cry, maybe at the same time, maybe not, depending.
 
What advice would you give your child-self about writing? 
Start earlier. It’s my regret that I didn’t seriously start writing when I was younger. Like many would-be writers I kept putting it off. Bad mistake.
 
What’s one book you think every Aussie kid should read before they leave primary school? 
Alison Lester’s Magic Beach.
 
What’s the best creative advice you’ve ever been given?
Give up your day job.
 
What is the most surprising thing (in your experience) about being an author?
That being an author involves a whole lot more than just writing. Public appearances, keeping up a social media profile, taking care of yourself as a small business, no one tells you about all those things!
 
What’s your top tip to get kids reading?
If you don’t like reading, that’s because you haven’t found the right book yet. Reading books you don’t like can be hard work or even boring. Reading books you do like isn’t work at all – it’s fun, entertaining, and addictive. Don’t give up the hunt for the right book.
 
If I peeked into your writing room what would I see?
My dog. While I am writing, he sleeps on the couch in my office. He doesn’t interrupt me, except when he thinks he has a really good idea for the story I’m writing.
 
What are you reading now?
Non-fiction – Tivoli King, about the early days of Australia’s music hall theatres. Scandals, arson, and fistfights – great stuff.
 
What is the best Australian book (from picture book to young adult book) that you’ve read so far in 2017?
Begin, End, Begin, a sensational Australian YA short story anthology.
 
What is the number one 2017 book release (from picture book to young adult book) that you think everyone should read?
Begin, End, Begin, a sensational Australian YA short story anthology.
 
Can you let us know a little bit about your recent book/s?
Gap Year in Ghost Town is a comedy horror adventure, where a young man undecided about his future agrees to go into the family business while he makes up his mind. The trouble is, the family business is ghost hunting … To make matters more difficult, ghost hunters from across the world have descended on his town and the difference in their approaches to ghost hunting creates massive friction. On top of this, a ghostly murder needs solving and the all important question of where you get a really good cup of coffee is grappled with. Gap Year in Ghost Town has pop culture, thrills, cosplay, romance, friendship, burgers, and more snark then you can poke a stick at.

 
 

Posted by Global Administrator on 22/08/2017