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Guest Post from Tomi Adeyemi - Children of Blood and Bone

Tomi Adeyemi is the debut author of Children of Blood and Bone a West African-inspired fantasy set in a stunning world of dark magic and danger. 
 



In the first story I ever wrote, I was the star. Well, I was the star(s). You see when you’re writing The Parent Trap fan fiction set on a horse farm with outfits from your favorite Bollywood Movie (shout out to Kabhi Khushi Kabhie Gham), you let yourself go crazy.

 

My twins started out being named “Marilynn” and “Carolynn,” but by the end of this 30-page masterpiece, the text reads along the lines of “Tomi galloped the black stallion into the storm to save him from himself! And she called out to her twin, also named Tomi, ‘Tomi help me!’”

 

As a kid, I had no problem imagining myself as the star. I loved myself so much, I put two of me into my first story.

 

But when I look back at every single story I wrote from the age of 6 to 18, I wasn’t the star. I wasn’t even the sidekick. In the stories I was writing – stories no one would ever see – I couldn’t picture myself as the protagonist because the world told me I couldn’t be one. 

 

So for twelve long and formative years, my stories only had white and biracial protagonist. Protagonist who got to fall in love and have adventures because even in my wildest imagination, I didn’t think black people got to have that.

 

I’ve come a long way from the girl that wrote The Parent Trap. I’ve come an even longer way from the girl who couldn’t picture herself within the pages of her own book, let alone on the cover of it.

 

I am so proud of Children of Blood and Bone and I hope it saves girls 12 years of wondering whether they’re fierce, beautiful, and magical to be the stars that they are.

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Zélie remembers when the soil of Orïsha hummed with magic. When different clans ruled – Burners igniting flames, Tiders beckoning waves, and Zélie’s Reaper mother summoning forth souls.

But everything changed the night magic disappeared. Under the orders of a ruthless king, anyone with powers was targeted and killed, leaving Zélie without a mother and her people without hope. Only a few people remain with the power to use magic, and they must remain hidden.

Zélie is one such person. Now she has a chance to bring back magic to her people and strike against the monarchy. With the help of a rogue princess, Zélie must learn to harness her powers and outrun the crown prince, who is hell-bent on eradicating magic for good.

Danger lurks in Orïsha, where strange creatures prowl, and vengeful spirits wait in the waters. Yet the greatest danger may be Zélie herself as she struggles to come to terms with the strength of her magic – and her growing feelings for an enemy.

The movie of Children of Blood and Bone is in development at Fox 2000/Temple Hill Productions with the incredible Karen Rosenfelt and Wyck Godfrey (Twilight, Maze Runner, The Fault In Our Stars) producing it.




 

Posted by Global Administrator on 13/03/2018