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RE:Dinner with Edward Review

I received this book as a pre-release and was very much looking forward to reading it. Unfortunately I found it a little slow but as I continued, I did warm to the friendship that was forming between Isabel and Edward. Each chapter with it's own Menu was a lovely touch.
Without spoiling the ending, I wanted to know more.

RE:" My fellow officers....it is dangerous...."

Hi Ghost Writer, one book that may interest you covering the Russo-Japanese War on 1904-1905 with a Great War connection is this title: "A Staff Officer's Scrap Book" by Sir Ian Hamilton. I have a 1912 first-edition and it is full of great maps and drawings by Sir Ian Hamilton. I found my copy in a second hand book shop in Melbourne many years ago and I love looking through it although I haven't read it yet :)

RE:" My fellow officers....it is dangerous...."

Hi History Lover, How excellent is that! New books. Seriously, you have me there. I can't really make any comment about the Wars in China, though I had a passing interest years ago in the Chinese/ Japanese wars of , eh, 1907(?) Correct me on the dates if I'm wrong. I rather took an interest in the foreign observers that went around various international conflicts, their uniforms and conclusions in their subsequent reports. You need to educate me on these expansive wars in China. And yes, I am so happy to get " Owen's Complete Poems and Fragments" again. That one was a particular sadder loss years ago. Done and fixed up!!  Your find on Ypres sounds very interesting. My " Glum Heroes" has been posted from the UK and ought to be here in a few days. These Helion titles are really well researched and packaged well with their printing and binding. Good reading, History Lover!  We had a nice sunny warm day on Saturday and dare I say, we are in for more cold and rain. Last night a pipe burst down the road because it was overloaded with the heavy rains here and flash flooding. The  back garden is leached and nothing is growing properly and it is so sodden like the beginning of a corner in Flanders fields.

RE:" My fellow officers....it is dangerous...."

That's excellent news on your obtaining a copy of "The Complete Poems of Wilfred Owen", well done, an excellent addition to your library. I have just finished reading an old 1960's book on the British campaign in Mesopotomia; "The Bastard War" by A. J. Barker. I am now reading a 2013 publication: "The Battle for Manchuria and the Fate of China: Siping, 1946" by Harold Tanner. In regards to new books I have just picked these two books from my PO Box: "The Battle of Minden 1759" by Stuart Reid and "Where Chiang Kai-Shek Lost China: The Liao-Shen Campaign, 1948". 
 
​In regards to new books on the Great War I picked this book up at half price recently: "The Battle book of Ypres: A Reference to Military Operations in the Ypres Salient 1914-1918" by Beatrix Brice. It was first published in 1927 but this is a 2014 reprint. Its a sort of guide book of places and events in the Salient for those who wished to see where their loved ones fought and died during the Great War.
 
The weather here in Canberra is overcast and I think more rain is forecast, not as bad as down your way but I wonder if we will see the sun again soon :)

" My fellow officers....it is dangerous...."

Hi History Lover, Hope you are well and enjoying the benefits of new books!  I have finished " Playing the Game: The British Junior Infantry Officer on the Western Front 1914-18" by Christopher Moore-Bick, Helion and I must say I am glad I have it in my library. It is a most welcome addition and is a comprehensive, highly informative and well researched book on the little known subject of the junior officer in WW1. Being the first book Moore-Bick has written I look forward to further books from him in the furture. " Playing the Game" works well with Lewis-Stempel's " Six Weeks..." to give the reader an allround view of what it was like to be a junior officer dealing with all the issues of commanding, billeting, feeding, and caring for his men's general well being as well as dealing with Staff Officers and possible advancement and survival. I recommend it. Moore-Bick has left nothing to chance in his study and has been very thorough in his research and writing to produce a readable but scholarly work! He has sourced well and far and references are impecable and complete. In this terriblly chilly and sodden week I have received  some good books from the UK..." Memory, Narrative and the Great War: Rifleman MacGill and the Construction of Wartime Experience" by David Taylor, " A Sense of  Shock: the Impact of Impressionism on Modern British and Irish Writing" by Adam Parkes and after SIX MONTHS of impatient waiting, " The Complete Poems and Fragments of Wilfred Owen( 2 vols hardcover, slipcased) .Mmm my preciousessss... The supplier in UK didn't know whether they had it or not, eh, however, thanks to my local Dymocks people here in Market Square Geelong and my own doggedness, it finally arrived yesterday. So I'm over the moon! What of you, History Lover?  Have you had any book- goodness come your way this week? Weather? Best day yet today with sun and a gentle breeze to edge up the temperature a tad, with a chance of more rain/ floods to come.

RE:Forget about Dodging Bombs and Bullets, It is The Time for Reflection...

Hello History Lover,  Yes, " Drummer Hodge" is excellent and I wait with expectation of another book on this subject, if not only to "upgrade' some moot points. Sarah Cole and the like have used his book extensively in their research of WW1 writing and its roots in Georgian and Victorian poetry. As C. J. Dennis says: ' I dips me lid to him" for such an insightful  volume.  Good to hear you are reading Barton. He has several books on the market in the same panoramic  vein as your "Arras". A well respected author and researcher. I did buy a copy of " Six Weeks" by Lewis-Stempel but could only get a paperback copy. However that will do. It should arrive from the UK in the next little while. Also my " " Memory, Narrative and the Great War: Rifleman McGill etc and " A Sense of Shock: Impressionism and Writing in Britain and Ireland" by Parkes have both left the UK and on their way to me in the next few days.   Your " Genghis Khan" sounds a wonderful read and I look forward to hearing more about it soon. Currently reading " Playing  The Game" by Moore-Bick ( Helion) and " Voices of Silence" by Noakes you sent me. It fills in a gap of WW1 poetry of the not so well known works that were written in response to the War. Very impressed.  Today is a little sunny with gusty winds and strato-cumulus  clouds, puffy little cotton wool clouds and azure sky . Tad chilly.

RE:Forget about Dodging Bombs and Bullets, It is The Time for Reflection...

Hi Ghost Writer, "Drummer Hodge" sounds like an excallent addition to your library, well done :)

​I have finished my book on the Zeppelins in combat during the Great War, it was a well researched book and although published in the 1960's still a very good account. I have continued with my WW1 reading and finally picked up another older book; "The Bastard War: The Mesopotamian Campaign of 1914-1918" by A. J. Barker, first published in 1967. It has been a pretty good account so far.
 
I have also purchased a copy of this Imperial War Museum book; "Arras: The spring 1917 offensive in panoramas including Vimy Ridge and Bullecourt" by Peter Barton. Its a large landscape book of over 300 pages, very nicely presented with pull out maps and panoramic photographs of the battlefields.
 
I am also still reading my book on Genghis Khan by Frank McLynn, again another pretty interesting book and one that I am enjoying on the rainy days up here in Canberra.
 
I hope you are well and enjoying a good book or two and hopefully your weather is better than mine, but then again its perfect reading weather eh!

RE:Forget about Dodging Bombs and Bullets, It is The Time for Reflection...

Hi History Lover,On a coldish and bleak, early Spring, mid Monday morning here in Geelong, where the winds blow up from the bay and end up a mini cyclone in my backyard, I have to say life isn't still  too shabby right now....the postman has just dropped off my copy of " Drummer Hodge; The Poetry of the Anglo-Boer War 1899-1902" by M .Van Wyk Smith. Originally published by Oxford Uni Press, my hardcover edition is printed under license by them in South Africa by Protea Book House. Same thing with  the black and white illustrations..and I'm thrilled' to the back teeth' with finally having a copy of this incredible book in my library! Also arrived " The Wipers Times" in hardcover.

RE:Forget about Dodging Bombs and Bullets, It is The Time for Reflection...

Hi History Lover, there are some good books on the Zeppelin raids over Britain. " Gott Strafe England" vols 1 and 2 by Helion being amongst the most interesting. History Press have done a kind of series town by town of the air raids and they least appeal. Your book  sounds quite the thing and most fascinating. Schiffer are great. I have some of their books on uniforms of the 1914-1918 armies. Absolutely excellent books. I'm waiting on " Drummer Hodge: Poetry of the Anglo Boer War" to arrive from UK. Expecting it this week or early next week, with great anticipation! To date, it is the only study on the subject and it was printed in 1978. So I am very keen. " Genghis Khan" looks a great book.I'll check it out. Hope you enjoyed that Italian red and a quiet read.

RE:Forget about Dodging Bombs and Bullets, It is The Time for Reflection...

Hi Ghost Writer, I had a good time in Sydney and brought home some excellent additions to my library although my bank account needs some time to recover. I am currently reading two interesting but different books; "The Zeppelin in Combat 1912-1918" by Douglas Robinson. My copy was published in 1966, there is a newer edition about published by Schiffer (USA).
 
The other book is Frank McLynn's book; "Genghis Khan: His Conquests, his Empire, his Legacy". So far it has been pretty good, so much so that I dug out my DVD of the movie "Mongol" and watched that again. It was good to see that the movie stuck pretty close to the known facts (or most of them) and I am hoping that they do reconsider and complete the trilogy.

One of the books that I ordered up in Sydney arrived; "Frederick Barbarossa: The Prince and the Myth" by Prof. John Freed along with "God's Wolf" which is the story of Reynald de Chatillon and his role in the Crusades.
 
Sounds like you have picked up some great books as well, I hope they keep on coming :)
 
The weather in Canberra at the moment is wet and overcast, perfect coffee and book reading weather! OK, I'm off to open a nice bottle of Italian red and pour a glass and read some more on the Zeppeling offensive against London, hope you are well and enjoying a good book as well.

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